Dixon may not consider himself one of the best ever, but IndyCar world certainly does

0 Comments

SONOMA, California — When you talk about the best drivers in Indy car racing history, by winning his fifth career Indy car championship Sunday, Scott Dixon indisputably and unequivocally is now in the same rare Indy car fraternity as legendary A.J. Foyt and Mario Andretti.

Consider:

* Dixon is now only the second driver ever in Indy car racing to win five championships – and the first to do it in 51 years! That’s more than a half-century. The other driver to ever reach five wins is Foyt, who ultimately would go on to win seven titles in his illustrious career.

* With Sunday’s crown, Dixon passed Andretti, who earned four Indy car titles in his own illustrious career.

* With three race wins in 2018 en route to the championship, Dixon is now up to 44 wins in his Indy car career. That leaves him only eight away from tying Andretti for No. 2 on the sport’s all-time wins list.

* Given that since 2013, Dixon has earned 15 wins and three of his five career Indy car championships, one must wonder how much more prolific he’ll continue to be in 2019, 2020, 2021 and beyond. At the rate he’s going, Dixon potentially could tie and even break Andretti’s 52 wins within the next 3-4 seasons.

* Foyt’s 67 career wins may be a bit too far for Dixon to achieve. But looking at it from a glass half-full, half-empty perspective, if anyone can top Foyt, Dixon may be the only driver that ever could. It may take him another decade – along with the potential of winning another 2 or 3 or more championships in the process – but don’t completely rule out Dixon catching Foyt.

* And if that were to happen, Dixon would truly, positively be the absolute best there ever has been in Indy car racing.

Photo: IndyCar

Now, enough with the statistics. Let’s talk about Scott Dixon the man.

One of the definitions of the word “humility” is this: “a modest or low view of one’s own importance; humbleness.”

Humility could very easily be Dixon’s middle name. He doesn’t toot his own horn or say how great he is, even though with his kind of career numbers, he certainly could.

When asked after Sunday’s race whether he considers himself among the best Indy car drivers ever, the 38-year-old New Zealand native immediately demurred.

“I don’t see myself that way at all,” he said, almost blushing. “I feel lucky, am very blessed in many ways. … I feel lucky I get to do what I love to do, get to work with the best in the business.”

But one of the best ever? Nope.

“I guess I just don’t see it that way,” Dixon reiterated.

No one could have imagined how Dixon would fare when he joined Chip Ganassi Racing just three races into the 2002 season when his team, Pac West Racing, folded.

Not team owner Chip Ganassi, not chief strategist Mike Hull, not even Dixon himself.

But there was something about Dixon that Ganassi just knew that he had to sign him and field a race car for him. He knew he had talent, having earned a win and two podium finishes in his rookie CART season with Pac West the year before in 2001.

Yet there was more to Dixon than just having a heavy foot and sharp reflexes to muscle a car through one turn after another.

Ganassi liked the way Dixon carried himself both inside and outside of a race car. He had a confident but quiet and modest air.

Team owner Chip Ganassi went crowd surfing to celebrate Scott Dixon’s 5th IndyCar championship — and Ganassi’s 12th as a team owner. Photo: IndyCar

Perhaps more than anything, it was the humility that Dixon displayed back then – the same kind of humility he still displays today – that sold Ganassi on the young Kiwi.

And continues to be sold on more than 16 years later into their relationship.

Dixon is the consummate professional both as a driver and a human being. He’s a dedicated family man, has never been involved in any type of scandal, never has been arrested nor had his name splashed across the front page of a newspaper for anything else other than being the great driver he is.

Another illustration of Dixon’s humility was seen as soon as he climbed out of his race car in victory lane. Instead of stopping to be interviewed on TV, he first made a beeline to his crew members, to thank each of them personally.

Then, when he finally did turn around to face the camera, the first thing Dixon said wasn’t about how happy he was to win the championship, but rather how appreciative he was to his wife and for the guys that made it happen, his team.

“I can’t thank everyone enough, my wife Emma, the team, my teammate (Ed Jones), everybody involved,” Dixon humbly said. “This doesn’t come without a lot of hard work.”

Then, when he walked into the media center to be grilled by reporters, one of the first things out of Dixon’s mouth was:

“Got to give huge credit to the team. They kind of just went on a wholesale change, everything worked out perfectly, the car had some great speed.”

Dixon shares a special moment with one of his daughters after winning the IndyCar championship.

He also exalted that his daughters, Poppy and Tilly, were in attendance to see Dad win it all.

“So cool to have Poppy and Tilly here,” Dixon beamed with pride. “It’s their first championship. They’ve been to a couple race wins, but it was really cool to have them here today.”

Obviously, racing is a sport where fans cheer for their favorites and boo those they don’t like. But admit it, when was the last time you ever heard Dixon get booed?

Virtually every fan at Sonoma Raceway applauded Dixon after he crossed the finish line for a job well done in winning the championship and doing what he needed to do to beat chief challenger Alexander Rossi.

Then there were the countless fellow drivers, owners and crew members from other teams that came up to congratulate Dixon on No. 5.

Not only is it rare to hear Dixon being booed, when was the last time a fellow driver criticized or outright blasted Dixon?

You might be able to count the number of times that’s happened in his career on one hand – and have a few fingers still left over.

Dixon truly is humility personified in a sport where being humble isn’t the easiest way to be. Some might even view humility as some sort of weakness.

But if there ever was a dictionary written about Dixon, alongside the words “humility” and “respect” would be his photo.

Even though Dixon “doesn’t see it that way,” there’s no disputing that the IndyCar world DOES see it that way.

“I’ve said it a thousand times, he’s the guy on the track, off the track,” Ganassi said of Dixon. “If you take a piece of stone, inject some brains into it, chisel it out, it’s Scott Dixon. He’s just the man.”

Follow @JerryBonkowski

Chase Sexton wins Triple Crown Anaheim 2 Supercross: Levi Kitchen unseats Jett Lawrence in 250s

Supercross Anaheim 2
Feld Motor Sports/MX Sports Pro Racing/Align Media
0 Comments

Chase Sexton won two of the three races in the Monster Energy Supercross Anaheim 2 Triple Crown, which was enough to overcome a fifth-place finish in Race 2 and give him the overall victory. It was the second Supercross win of his career.

“Super big night for me,” Sexton told NBC Sports’ Will Christien. “After last weekend with that being a struggle, I just need to come out here and stop the bleeding a little bit and I did that tonight.”

Sexton suffered a crash on Lap 1 of his heat, sending him into Last Chance Qualifier. The bad gate pick put him in a difficult position to start the race and he was able to climb to only fifth at the checkers.

At Anaheim 2, three riders entered the final race of the Triple Crown in a winner-take-all scenario. Sexton, Jason Anderson and Eli Tomac each had a shot at victory. It raised the intensity level for all riders in an evening that featured a lot of comers and goers.

Jason Anderson took the early lead in Race 3, which set him up for the overall victory. Sexton stalked and passed him midway through the race and then a minor mistake late allowed Webb to slip around as well. Anderson’s 5-1-3 gave him second overall.

“I had a tough couple of rounds, getting off that Anaheim 1 crash and then last week weekend I fumbled a little bit, but I’m excited to get back on the box and start moving forward,” Anderson told Jason Thomas.

Anderson finished seventh in the first two rounds of 2023.

RESULTS: How they finished for the 450 Main in Anaheim 2

Ken Roczen was the model of consistency in the opening rounds and at Anaheim 2. In three races so far this year, he’s gotten progressively better each time with a fifth in A1, a fourth last week in San Deigo and a third this week.

With results of 2-3-4, he earned his first podium of the season, which lands him fourth in the standings.

“This was hard earned,” Roczen said after the race. “I completely botched the start and then to have to work my way up. I only happen on the very last lap to step up here on the podium.”

Webb’s solid second-place finish in the third race allowed him to leapfrog several riders and finish fourth overall, but a seventh in Race 1 kept him off the podium. He improved in each race in Anaheim, however, with a 7-4-2.

With a 4-6-5, Dylan Ferrandis rounded out the top five.

The intensity of the race was a little too much for Tomac.

While battling side-by-side with Webb in Race 3 at the one-third mark, Tomac jumped wide and crashed hard. He fell to 14th, doing some damage to his bike in the process. He advanced only one position in that race to 13th. His first two races, a third and second, were strong enough to give him sixth overall. He retains the points lead, but it has shrunk to a gap of only four over Sexton and Webb.

Malcolm Stewart injured late in the week and was not able to mount.


Levi Kitchen became the first rider to unseat Jett Lawrence in the Triple Crown format at Anaheim 2 and won the overall with consistency. In his three races, Kitchen finished 4-2-2 to narrowly edge the winner of the first two races.

“This whole day; this is unbelievable. I took a few good slams in practice and I was down on myself,” Kitchen told NBC Sports Jason Thomas afterward. “The first moto I got a good start and got shuffled back, then I knew I just needed to be consistent.”

Jett Lawrence saved his best for last – which wasn’t hard given the struggles he experienced in the first two races.

Despite those problems, he entered Race 3 of the Triple Crown three points behind Kitchen after suffering a pair of disappointing races by his personal measuring stick. In the first and second 250 races of the night, Lawrence hit the ground. He dropped to the final rider in the running order in Race 2 with a Lap 1 fall. But in both races, he was able to overcome his mistake and close the gap so that he had a chance to take his first Triple Crown win of his career.

Click here for full 250 West Main Results

Lawrence rode to third in Race 1 and sixth in Race 2. In the final race of the night, Lawrence did all he could. He earned the holeshot, but when Kitchen fell in behind him, Lawrence’s fate was sealed. His 3-6-1 tied him in points with Stilez Robertson, but the tiebreaker goes to the final round and his win secured second-place.

“I can definitely say Triple Crowns are not my thing,” Lawrence told NBC Sports Will Christien. “We have one more to try and fix this, so hopefully we can get that done.”

Lawrence will move into the 450 class for the Lucas Oil Motocross outdoor season and his 250 record book will be closed.

The best news for Lawrence is the other riders who entered this round in the top three had a worse night, so Lawrence leaves Anaheim with a 16-point gap on Cameron McAdoo and 17 over RJ Hampshire.

Roberston finished 6-1-3 to take the final step of the podium.

“Getting that win in the second Main meant a lot,” Roberston told Thomas. “I wish I could have done a little better in the third one, but we’re still up here on the box.”

Mitchell Oldenburg used consistency to earn fourth in the overall. He finished 5-4-6.

After missing the Main last week in San Diego, Max Vohland finished 7-8-4 to round out the top five.

RJ Hampshire set himself up as the early favorite with his Race 1 win. In Race 2, it all fell apart. He fell in the sand section and damaged his bike, finishing last in that race. The final event of the night for the 250s provided only a 13th-place finish, leaving Hampshire deep in the points.

Cameron McAdoo hard crash in qualification, which was scary news for a team that has seen three of their riders sidelined with injury. McAdoo was never quite able to get his rhythm with an 8-7-5.

2023 Race Recaps

San Diego: Eli Tomac, Jett Lawrence double down
Anaheim 1: Tomac wins opener for the first time

Anaheim 2 coverage

Power Rankings Week 2
SuperMotocross tightens playoff schedule
Eli Tomac, Jett Lawrence go two-for-two in San Diego
Results and points after San Diego
Seth Hammaker to miss 250 E season opener with wrist injury
Jo Shimoda joins Seth Hammaker, Austin Forkner with injury
Injury sidelines Austin Forkner for remainder of 2023 SX