Photo courtesy of Monster Energy AMA Supercross

2019 Monster Energy Supercross to visit Nashville; return to Detroit, Denver, Jersey

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The 2019 Monster Energy AMA Supercross schedule will have a good mix of returning markets, one brand new market and three other markets that will see a return by the series.

“The 2018 season proved once again that Supercross is a very exciting sport,” FIM president Vito Ippolito said. “It kept us on the edge of our seats until the final round in Las Vegas.

“Supercross is also a demanding discipline and one that brings the best out of the riders and their teams. But most of all, it is an unpredictable sport that can take us all by surprise!”

The series will feature 17 events in 16 markets over 18 weeks. Nashville is new, while the series returns to Ford Field in Detroit and MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., after both were last on the schedule in 2017.

And then there’s a long overdue return to Denver’s Broncos Stadium (formerly Mile-High Stadium), which last hosted the series in 1996.

Nashville’s Nissan Stadium will play host to the Supercross series for the first time in its 45-year history.

The five-month schedule kicks off, as is tradition, at Angels Stadium in Anaheim, California on January 5, 2019 and concludes in Las Vegas on May 4.

“Much kudos goes to the 2018 AMA Supercross FIM World Champion Jason Anderson, who is a worthy successor to Ryan Dungey,” Ippolito said. “We are looking forward to a successful 2019 season.”

Technology both on and off the courses continues to be a hallmark of the Supercross series.

“We’re continuing to improve the fan experience and live entertainment aspect of the sport by using state-of-the-art technology, from spidercam footage and live heart rate monitor displays, to featuring a festival-like atmosphere in the paddock,” said Dave Prater, Senior Director of Operations for Two-Wheel, Feld Entertainment. “As we head into 2019 with a brand-new defending champion for the first time in four years, Jason Anderson will certainly be the one to watch.

“That, combined with the sport’s first-ever developmental platform for Supercross amateur racing, will ultimately set the stage for years to come.”

Jason Anderson won the Monster Energy AMA Supercross 450SX championship last season for the first time in his career.

Anderson earned his first career 450SX Class crown in the final round of the 2018 season this past May 5. It was also the first time that Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing has earned the 450SX Class title.

Also new to the schedule is the eight-race Supercross Futures, which culminates in an AMA Amateur National Championship. for the first time. The first Futures event will be Jan. 13, in Glendale, Arizona.

The Futures championship will be decided Oct. 20-21, 2019, following next year’s Monster Energy Cup in Las Vegas.

Tickets for the 2019 season will go on sale on Tuesday, October 23 with a presale date of Tuesday, October 9.

Before that, though, the top Supercross riders will take part on Oct. 13 in the invitation-only Monster Energy Cup all-star event in Las Vegas.

Marvin Musquin won last year’s Cup event at Sam Boyd Stadium and is seeking to become the first rider in Supercross history to ever win the “Monster Million” twice.

“AMA Supercross is among the most impressive displays of two-wheeled motorsports in the world, and for many amateur AMA racers, it represents the pinnacle of their competitive dreams,” said AMA President and CEO, Rob Dingman. “Since the first AMA Supercross Champion was crowned in 1974, the sport and spectacle have grown and evolved, thanks in large part to the close cooperation with our promoting partner, Feld Motor Sports.

“Generations of some of the world’s greatest motorcycle racers have held high the AMA Supercross No. 1 plate, and I can’t wait to see who earns that honor in 2019.”

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Keating stripped of Le Mans GTE-Am win; No. 68 Ganassi entry also disqualified

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FIA stewards announced Monday that two Ford GT entries have been disqualified from this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans, including the GTE-Am class-winning No. 85 entry from privateer Keating Motorsports.

Also DQ’d was the factory No. 68 Chip Ganassi Racing entry of Joey Hand, Dirk Mueller and Sebastien Bourdais, which initially finished fourth in the GTE-Pro class.

Both entries were found in violation of fuel capacity regulations, with the No. 85 entry also failing to meet the minimum refueling time during pit stops.

The refueling system on the No. 85 entry, driven by Ben Keating, Jeroen Bleekemolen and Felipe Fraga, measured a time of 44.4 seconds during a stop, just shy of the minimum required time of 45 seconds.

As a result, the team was initially issued a 55.2-second post-race penalty by officials, which elevated the No. 56 Team Project 1 Porsche 911 RSR of Joerg Bergmeister, Patrick Lindsey, and Egidio Perfetti to the class win.

The time penalty was calculated by the difference in the refueling time (0.6 seconds) multiplied by the amount of pit stops made by the team (23), then multiplied by four.

The No. 85 entry was set to finish second in class, but then received an outright DQ after its fuel capacity was also revealed to be 0.1 liters above the maximum permitted capacity of 96 liters.

As for Ganassi’s No. 68 entry, it was found to have a fuel capacity of 97.83 liters, which is above the maximum allowed capacity of 97 liters for the GTE-Pro Fords.

The No. 67 Ford of Andy Priaulx, Harry Tincknell, and Jonathan Bomarito subsequently moves up to fourth, and the No. 69 Ford of Scott Dixon, Ryan Briscoe and Richard Westbrook moves up to fifth.

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