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Nicholas Latifi becomes Williams new reserve driver

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Nicholas Latifi will join Williams F1 as a reserve driver in 2019, joining Robert Kubica and George Russell.

Latifi will get time behind the wheel with six first practice sessions during Grand Prix weekends, two in-season test sessions, one pre-season test day at Barcelona and two Pirelli tire tests as well as conducting simulator training at the Williams factory.

“I’m thrilled to be joining an iconic team like Williams as a reserve driver for 2019,” said Latifi at Formula1.com. “It’s a fantastic opportunity to continue my F1 development, and to build my on-track experience with more FP1 sessions and the rookie and Pirelli tests.”

Latifi has previous experience as a test driver at Renault and a test/reserve driver with Force India.

Last year Latifi competed in his second Formula 2 campaign. He scored one win and two more three podiums.

“Nicholas has been racing successfully in the junior formula, he has the racing pedigree that we’re looking for and he is incredibly intelligent and diligent,” said deputy team principal Claire Williams. “Nicholas will drive in FP1 sessions and at several tests next year. Along with this, he will undertake simulator work for the team. We are certain he will be a great fit for the team and we look forward to working with Nicholas next season.”

IMSA’s 50th Anniversary Celebration: Why Sebring is so special to Bobby Rahal

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Bobby Rahal has driven in some of the biggest races in the world, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Rolex 24 Hours and, of course, winning the Indianapolis 500 as a driver in 1986 and in 2004 as a team owner.

But winning the 12 Hours of Sebring two years in a row (1987 and 1988), Rahal feels, is right up there in terms of his greatest accomplishments as a race car driver.

As IMSA celebrates its 50th anniversary, Rahal reflected on what racing at Sebring International Raceway has meant to him:

“To me, Sebring is the ultimate endurance race. Not as long as Daytona or Le Mans, but the demands put on a car and driver at Sebring are highly unusual.

“My father raced at Sebring in the late 60’s. To win that race two years in a row really meant something to me.

“While we’ve won a lot of other races, we’ve won just about everywhere, you name it. But for me personally, winning at Sebring those two years in a row was very special.”

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