Dakar Stage 1 Highlights: Ricky Brabec, Casey Currie lead Americans

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The 41st running of the Dakar Rally got underway Monday with a total of 334 vehicles ready to contest a route that will be held entirely in Peru.

In the cars class, Nasser Al-Attiyah drew the first victory in his Toyota. Carlos Sainz was only 1 minute 59 seconds behind in a Mini with Jakub Przygonski rounding out the podium one second behind Sainz. … Making his 12th Dakar start and first after a two-year hiatus, Robby Gordon finished 21st in the stage (8:28 behind the leader) in his Textron. … Sebastian Loeb also got off to a slow start in Stage 1. Sand has never been his favorite part of any rally and he finished more than six minutes behind Al-Attiyah in 13th.

In motorcycles, Joan Barreda scored the stage win in a Honda. Pablo Qunitanilla in a Husqvarna ended the stage 1:34 behind in second. USA’s Ricky Brabec had the best showing among the Americans with his third-place finish 2:52 behind. Andrew Short was the next highest finishing American in 13th. … Gabor Saghmeister became the first rider to withdraw from the 2019 Dakar.

In side by sides, the 2018 winner, 59-year old Reinaldo Varela won the stage over Francisco Lopez (1:27 behind) and Gerald Farres (2:32 behind). American Casey Currie was 4:55 behind in sixth in a stage where he took extra time to keep from making any mistakes.

“Day 1 of Dakar finally in the books,” Currie said. “We had a game plan; we wanted a good top-10 finish. We just wanted to drive through the stage without getting lost, without getting a puncture and not break anything. And we did it. In the river bed, there was a lot of rocks. I’m not kidding you I could have walked faster. I just wanted to take my time and get through Stage 1.”

In quads, Nicolas Cavigliasso finished 1:27 ahead of Jeremias Gonzalez and 2:32 ahead of Tomas Kubiena.

In trucks, Eduard Nikolaev, Ton Van Genugten, and Federico Villagra took the top three spots. But it was Gerard de Rooy who created the most drama of the day. Running second at the halfway mark of the start, he set a wheel on fire and finished the stage fourth.

For more watch the video above and check out the daily highlight show on NBCSN. Click here for the complete schedule.

Eli Tomac’s near-perfect season ended perfectly

ProMotocross.com
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From the start, Eli Tomac wanted to go into the season-ending race at Ironman Raceway with the 2020 red plate already in his possession. That final race has been know to devolve into muddy conditions and it is best not to leave things to chance.

For a rider with an almost perfect record of overall podium finishes, one would not have thought there would be much drama at the end of Round 11 at Budds Creek, but it took until the last lap of the final moto for Tomac to achieve his goal.

One reason was that Tomac’s near-perfect season was not so perfect. From the very beginning at Hangtown, Tomac struggled with poor starts to his events. Getting a bad jump out of the gate and finishing fourth in Moto 1 that weekend was not the auspicious beginning he wanted in search of his third consecutive 450 outdoor championship.

The hallmark of Tomac’s season has been overcoming bad starts. He rode through the field at Hangtown and nearly stood on the podium. Then he won Moto 2 and finished second overall. It was his first of nine consecutive overall podiums. Tomac came back the following week for a perfect sweep at Pala.

In Round 3, Tomac once again got off to a bad start. He finished fifth in Moto 1 at Thunder Valley – and then won Moto 2 in a duplication of his opening round.

In Round 5, Tomac had his worst performance until that time. He finished seventh in Moto 1. Nearly halfway through the season, a pattern was firmly established with his Moto 2 win.

Vanessa O’Brien, Kawasaki USA

One should recall that the hallmark of Tomac’s season was strong finishes. Four the next four weeks Tomac failed to podium only one time in a moto. On that occasion, he would stumble in Moto 2 at Spring Creek in Round 8 before scoring his second perfect race at Washougal.

And that is where it got interesting. Tomac left Washougal with a 50-point advantage over Marvin Musquin. It was just the scenario Tomac had seesawed his way through the season to achieve. But it was too good to be true.

In most of his previous bad performances, there was an extenuating circumstance for Tomac’s bad start: a fall or an off course excursion. This time, he simply rode an uninspired race and finished seventh again to match his worst single moto performance. He could not fully rebound in Moto 2 and finished third.

For the first time in 2019, Tomac failed to stand on the overall podium in fourth. Worse still, he lost 10 points to Musquin and no longer had his one-race cushion.

But this is a season of recovery for Tomac. At Budds Creek last week it was reported that Tomac’s lackluster performance in Washington was due to his overdoing his chores on his Colorado ranch. Rested and restored, Tomac scored his third perfect race with Moto 1 & 2 wins. And this time, he looked sharper than he had in any previous race.

Tomac did all the could do by winning both motos, but in the closing laps at Budds Creek he needed a little help to clinch the title. As it turned out, Tomac needed the perfect performance to clinch his third consecutive championship.

In Moto 1, he narrowly edged Ken Roczen and Musquin, to give the three championship contenders a sweep of the top three spots; that was not enough to regain his cushion.

Roczen was close enough to force Tomac into The Ironman needing to score points to permanently affix the red plate on his Kawasaki in 2020, but just as Tomac’s season has been marked by second half improvements, Roczen’s has been marred by a lack of performance in the second motos.

Musquin passed Roczen late in Moto 2 last week and could have extended the drama one more week if he could have caught second-place Jason Anderson. Musquin could not erase an 11-second deficit to the runner-up and now Tomac’s almost perfect season has a distinctly perfect feel to it.

Vanessa O’Brien, Kawasaki USA

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