All-female team out to prove women racers aren’t a gimmick at Rolex 24

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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Every racing series in the world is full of wealthy enthusiasts with ideas that sound too good to be true. Expensive promises to fund life-changing opportunities are usually broken before cars even make it to the track.

Jackie Heinricher has defied those odds and turned an outlandish idea into one of the most highly anticipated debuts in racing.

She has put together an all-female team of drivers that will debut later this month at the Rolex 24 at Daytona, one of the most prestigious endurance races in the world. Her vision became a reality because she found a commercial sponsor with Caterpillar, landed a partner in Meyer Shank Racing and signed up top racers – all of whom wanted to be part of the unique project.

“I am scared, a little bit,” admitted British driver Katherine Legge. “I am scared that it will be gimmicky and we won’t be taken seriously. That’s why we have the drivers we have, that’s why we are going with a professional team, that’s why we made sure we had everything to do it right.

“We are going to be under a spotlight whether we like it or not, and the last thing we want to do is go out there and be like the `girl team.’ That is detrimental to what we are trying to achieve.”

Heinricher is an Air Force veteran, scientist and founder of her own biotech company, Booshoot Technology, based in Sun Valley, Idaho. She is also the female equivalent of a “gentleman racer” in the world of exotic cars, which means she pays her own way for the right to race against professionals on the top circuits in the world. Heinricher found that racing was the same as the STEM field in that women are an anomaly. There just were many female role models to follow.

Heinricher is a racing fan who often rooted for the female drivers, and just as the drivers themselves grew frustrated with their inability to advance in American racing, Heinricher grew tired of seeing the women leave the U.S. for opportunities in Europe.

“I started having this vision to bring these top women professionals together to race a season together,” Heinricher said.

Then she had to sell it, to drivers and sponsors. Sports car racing is one of the few series that requires multiple driver lineups, and Heinricher’s attempt to field an all-female team in a world-renowned series is unprecedented.

“I’ve watched many of these things fall flat on their faces, go out in the press without any substance,” she said. “I started talking with drivers and I was always very transparent that I had to accomplish the money side. There was skepticism. They were like, `Who is this crazy gentleman driver woman? What does she want from us?”‘

Legge has been part of enough crummy deals to be wary of hair-brained ideas. Legge was part of Lotus’ noncompetitive return to IndyCar, she was a centerpiece in the lineup for the weird DeltaWing sports car project and the driver for an Indianapolis 500 team that was going to be composed entirely of women. It never happened.

Legge knew of Heinricher’s idea for two years and agreed to be part of it because, for once, it looked as if the pieces were in place for something to actually come together.

Legge was already part of Meyer Shank Racing, and her Acura team won twice last season and finished second overall in IMSA’s GTD class. When Heinricher landed Caterpillar as sponsor for her vision, she was able to take it to Legge and the Meyer Shank team.

Then came signing the rest of the lineup. The roster for the twice-round-the-clock endurance race at Daytona is Legge, the full-time driver of the car, along with:

-Simona de Silvestro. A former IndyCar driver who has been a Formula One test driver, the “Swiss Missile” most recently competed in the Virgin Australia Supercars Championship.

-Bia Figueiredo. She raced as Ana Beatriz in IndyCar because it was easier to pronounce, and the Brazilian is the only woman to have won races at that series’ second level.

-Christina Nielsen. A two-time IMSA class champion, the Danish driver was brought in to complete the Rolex lineup because Heinricher injured her back in a crash testing the car in December.

The lineup has more combined experience and success than Danica Patrick, the most well-known female racer of this generation. And the group views it as a chance to further opportunities for women.

“Being the only girl you are given a hall pass. It’s, `Katherine is OK or Danica is OK,’ and you are taken as an independent person in a sea of women and they still make fun of woman drivers, but you are different somehow,” Legge explained. “And I am like, `No, that is not true. We can if we are given the opportunity to prove that we can do it.’

“There aren’t that many girls coming up through the ranks. Give girls positive role models that aren’t just stripping off and posing on the front of a car. You go to a race track and you see `Grid Girls’ and very rarely do you see engineers, people working behind the scenes, working on race cars. If you are a parent, and you have a kid who wants to be in racing, I wanted to show that that’s not the only way you can do it.”

The team is slated to run the entire IMSA schedule, and Figueiredo posted the fastest lap in class during a qualifying session earlier this month. That proved the car is no joke, and the lineup goes into the Jan. 26-27 season-opening race determined to prove they can compete with their male counterparts.

“I think we can be a contender for the race win,” Nielsen said. “We are all on the same page and have been for years. Kat and I frequently quote the saying `Once you are behind the wheel, the car can’t tell if it is a man or woman driving.”

Heinricher still plans to be part of the lineup at some point this season, but for now revels in her creation. She knows Legge worries about an effort that might set women back in racing. She is confident this venture will be different.

“I never sold this partnership to go out and be on the podium every day. There are very few role models for young girls in STEM,” she said. “Part of this partnership is not only does this do that, but it steps into cars and leadership and the STEM side. If I put together Humpty Dumpty with six broken pieces, I am sure that would be a gimmick and we’d be laughed at all day long. I just wanted to work with professional people.”

Heinricher has a real race team, but Legge believes judgment will still be based on the bottom line.

“One race is not going to be gimmicky or not gimmicky, but over the season if we finish last every race, absolutely that would be gimmicky,” Legge said. “But that’s not going to happen with the people we’ve put in place.”

Chase Sexton wins Triple Crown Anaheim 2 Supercross: Levi Kitchen unseats Jett Lawrence in 250s

Supercross Anaheim 2
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Chase Sexton won two of the three races in the Monster Energy Supercross Anaheim 2 Triple Crown, which was enough to overcome a fifth-place finish in Race 2 and give him the overall victory. It was the second Supercross win of his career.

“Super big night for me,” Sexton told NBC Sports’ Will Christien. “After last weekend with that being a struggle, I just need to come out here and stop the bleeding a little bit and I did that tonight.”

Sexton suffered a crash on Lap 1 of his heat, sending him into Last Chance Qualifier. The bad gate pick put him in a difficult position to start the race and he was able to climb to only fifth at the checkers.

At Anaheim 2, three riders entered the final race of the Triple Crown in a winner-take-all scenario. Sexton, Jason Anderson and Eli Tomac each had a shot at victory. It raised the intensity level for all riders in an evening that featured a lot of comers and goers.

Jason Anderson took the early lead in Race 3, which set him up for the overall victory. Sexton stalked and passed him midway through the race and then a minor mistake late allowed Webb to slip around as well. Anderson’s 5-1-3 gave him second overall.

“I had a tough couple of rounds, getting off that Anaheim 1 crash and then last week weekend I fumbled a little bit, but I’m excited to get back on the box and start moving forward,” Anderson told Jason Thomas.

Anderson finished seventh in the first two rounds of 2023.

RESULTS: How they finished for the 450 Main in Anaheim 2

Ken Roczen was the model of consistency in the opening rounds and at Anaheim 2. In three races so far this year, he’s gotten progressively better each time with a fifth in A1, a fourth last week in San Deigo and a third this week.

With results of 2-3-4, he earned his first podium of the season, which lands him fourth in the standings.

“This was hard earned,” Roczen said after the race. “I completely botched the start and then to have to work my way up. I only happen on the very last lap to step up here on the podium.”

Webb’s solid second-place finish in the third race allowed him to leapfrog several riders and finish fourth overall, but a seventh in Race 1 kept him off the podium. He improved in each race in Anaheim, however, with a 7-4-2.

With a 4-6-5, Dylan Ferrandis rounded out the top five.

The intensity of the race was a little too much for Tomac.

While battling side-by-side with Webb in Race 3 at the one-third mark, Tomac jumped wide and crashed hard. He fell to 14th, doing some damage to his bike in the process. He advanced only one position in that race to 13th. His first two races, a third and second, were strong enough to give him sixth overall. He retains the points lead, but it has shrunk to a gap of only four over Sexton and Webb.

Malcolm Stewart injured late in the week and was not able to mount.


Levi Kitchen became the first rider to unseat Jett Lawrence in the Triple Crown format at Anaheim 2 and won the overall with consistency. In his three races, Kitchen finished 4-2-2 to narrowly edge the winner of the first two races.

“This whole day; this is unbelievable. I took a few good slams in practice and I was down on myself,” Kitchen told NBC Sports Jason Thomas afterward. “The first moto I got a good start and got shuffled back, then I knew I just needed to be consistent.”

Jett Lawrence saved his best for last – which wasn’t hard given the struggles he experienced in the first two races.

Despite those problems, he entered Race 3 of the Triple Crown three points behind Kitchen after suffering a pair of disappointing races by his personal measuring stick. In the first and second 250 races of the night, Lawrence hit the ground. He dropped to the final rider in the running order in Race 2 with a Lap 1 fall. But in both races, he was able to overcome his mistake and close the gap so that he had a chance to take his first Triple Crown win of his career.

Click here for full 250 West Main Results

Lawrence rode to third in Race 1 and sixth in Race 2. In the final race of the night, Lawrence did all he could. He earned the holeshot, but when Kitchen fell in behind him, Lawrence’s fate was sealed. His 3-6-1 tied him in points with Stilez Robertson, but the tiebreaker goes to the final round and his win secured second-place.

“I can definitely say Triple Crowns are not my thing,” Lawrence told NBC Sports Will Christien. “We have one more to try and fix this, so hopefully we can get that done.”

Lawrence will move into the 450 class for the Lucas Oil Motocross outdoor season and his 250 record book will be closed.

The best news for Lawrence is the other riders who entered this round in the top three had a worse night, so Lawrence leaves Anaheim with a 16-point gap on Cameron McAdoo and 17 over RJ Hampshire.

Roberston finished 6-1-3 to take the final step of the podium.

“Getting that win in the second Main meant a lot,” Roberston told Thomas. “I wish I could have done a little better in the third one, but we’re still up here on the box.”

Mitchell Oldenburg used consistency to earn fourth in the overall. He finished 5-4-6.

After missing the Main last week in San Diego, Max Vohland finished 7-8-4 to round out the top five.

RJ Hampshire set himself up as the early favorite with his Race 1 win. In Race 2, it all fell apart. He fell in the sand section and damaged his bike, finishing last in that race. The final event of the night for the 250s provided only a 13th-place finish, leaving Hampshire deep in the points.

Cameron McAdoo hard crash in qualification, which was scary news for a team that has seen three of their riders sidelined with injury. McAdoo was never quite able to get his rhythm with an 8-7-5.

2023 Race Recaps

San Diego: Eli Tomac, Jett Lawrence double down
Anaheim 1: Tomac wins opener for the first time

Anaheim 2 coverage

Power Rankings Week 2
SuperMotocross tightens playoff schedule
Eli Tomac, Jett Lawrence go two-for-two in San Diego
Results and points after San Diego
Seth Hammaker to miss 250 E season opener with wrist injury
Jo Shimoda joins Seth Hammaker, Austin Forkner with injury
Injury sidelines Austin Forkner for remainder of 2023 SX