Photos and video courtesy NHRA

NHRA: After 11 wins and Top Fuel crown in 2018, what does Steve Torrence do for an encore?

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After one of the most dominating and successful seasons in NHRA history, one question remains about 2018 Top Fuel champion Steve Torrence: how much better can he become?

The Texas native, who has an affinity for wearing cowboy hats, is ready for his next rodeo – otherwise known as the 2019 NHRA Mello Yello Drag Racing Series, which kicks off this weekend with the season-opening Lucas Oil Winternationals at Auto Club Raceway in Pomona, California.

Having conquered both cancer and a heart attack in recent years, Torrence, who turns 36 in April, had one of the most impactful seasons in NHRA annals in 2018, winning nearly half of the races – 11 of 24.

Included in that outstanding performance was something the NHRA has never seen: Torrence won every one of the six Countdown to the Championship playoff races as he powered to the Top Fuel crown.

So what does Torrence do for an encore?

“We don’t have the same point to prove as last year, but it’s the same drive and maybe more, just for different reasons,” Torrence said in a media release. “The performance the last couple years speaks for itself, but we want to keep driving that home.

“We’ve gotten to the top, established the fact that we deserve to be there and we’re going to do everything we can to stay there. It’s business as usual for us (heading to Pomona) and that’s the way we’re going to approach it.”

Torrence, who won every time he reached the final round in 2018, ended the season with the championship-clinching win at Pomona, and now he kicks off the pursuit for a second title at the same location.

“I think we can maintain that focus,” Torrence said. “We had the same focus and drive we had in 2018 as we did in 2017 (finished second), we just channeled it and got used to working at a more intense level.

“We’ve been able to operate at such a high level for so many races, I think we’re accustomed to doing that. You see the way guys like Tony (eight-time champion Tony Schumacher) and Antron (three-time champ Antron Brown) operate and they’re used to being battle-ready. That’s how we want to be.”

Torrence’s performance in the last three seasons – 3 wins in 2016, 8 wins in 2017 and 11 triumphs in 2018, part of his overall 27 career Top Fuel wins – has vaulted him into conversations as one of the best drivers Top Fuel has seen in quite a while.

And given what Torrence and his 11,000-horsepower Capco Contractors dragster accomplished at last weekend’s annual NHRA preseason test in Chandler, Arizona – being the quickest car with a run of 3.689 seconds at 328.78 mph – it’s pretty clear he’s ready to pick up where he left off at the end of the 2018 campaign.

“To go do what we did at testing, that just bolsters our confidence,” Torrence said. “We’re looking forward to Pomona and we’re going to be real simple about it.

“The key is to go out and win rounds and if you’re able to do that four times, that’s a race. That’s how we’ve approached it the last two years and we’re going to keep that same approach.

“It’s humbling to be in the position we’re in and to think about the success we’ve had, but we’re not close to being done yet.”

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Eli Tomac’s near-perfect season ended perfectly

ProMotocross.com
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From the start, Eli Tomac wanted to go into the season-ending race at Ironman Raceway with the 2020 red plate already in his possession. That final race has been know to devolve into muddy conditions and it is best not to leave things to chance.

For a rider with an almost perfect record of overall podium finishes, one would not have thought there would be much drama at the end of Round 11 at Budds Creek, but it took until the last lap of the final moto for Tomac to achieve his goal.

One reason was that Tomac’s near-perfect season was not so perfect. From the very beginning at Hangtown, Tomac struggled with poor starts to his events. Getting a bad jump out of the gate and finishing fourth in Moto 1 that weekend was not the auspicious beginning he wanted in search of his third consecutive 450 outdoor championship.

The hallmark of Tomac’s season has been overcoming bad starts. He rode through the field at Hangtown and nearly stood on the podium. Then he won Moto 2 and finished second overall. It was his first of nine consecutive overall podiums. Tomac came back the following week for a perfect sweep at Pala.

In Round 3, Tomac once again got off to a bad start. He finished fifth in Moto 1 at Thunder Valley – and then won Moto 2 in a duplication of his opening round.

In Round 5, Tomac had his worst performance until that time. He finished seventh in Moto 1. Nearly halfway through the season, a pattern was firmly established with his Moto 2 win.

Vanessa O’Brien, Kawasaki USA

One should recall that the hallmark of Tomac’s season was strong finishes. Four the next four weeks Tomac failed to podium only one time in a moto. On that occasion, he would stumble in Moto 2 at Spring Creek in Round 8 before scoring his second perfect race at Washougal.

And that is where it got interesting. Tomac left Washougal with a 50-point advantage over Marvin Musquin. It was just the scenario Tomac had seesawed his way through the season to achieve. But it was too good to be true.

In most of his previous bad performances, there was an extenuating circumstance for Tomac’s bad start: a fall or an off course excursion. This time, he simply rode an uninspired race and finished seventh again to match his worst single moto performance. He could not fully rebound in Moto 2 and finished third.

For the first time in 2019, Tomac failed to stand on the overall podium in fourth. Worse still, he lost 10 points to Musquin and no longer had his one-race cushion.

But this is a season of recovery for Tomac. At Budds Creek last week it was reported that Tomac’s lackluster performance in Washington was due to his overdoing his chores on his Colorado ranch. Rested and restored, Tomac scored his third perfect race with Moto 1 & 2 wins. And this time, he looked sharper than he had in any previous race.

Tomac did all the could do by winning both motos, but in the closing laps at Budds Creek he needed a little help to clinch the title. As it turned out, Tomac needed the perfect performance to clinch his third consecutive championship.

In Moto 1, he narrowly edged Ken Roczen and Musquin, to give the three championship contenders a sweep of the top three spots; that was not enough to regain his cushion.

Roczen was close enough to force Tomac into The Ironman needing to score points to permanently affix the red plate on his Kawasaki in 2020, but just as Tomac’s season has been marked by second half improvements, Roczen’s has been marred by a lack of performance in the second motos.

Musquin passed Roczen late in Moto 2 last week and could have extended the drama one more week if he could have caught second-place Jason Anderson. Musquin could not erase an 11-second deficit to the runner-up and now Tomac’s almost perfect season has a distinctly perfect feel to it.

Vanessa O’Brien, Kawasaki USA

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