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Qualification report for Houston Supercross

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The three riders chasing Cooper Webb all posted top-four timed practice speeds while the points leader landed eighth on the chart for Round 13 of the Supercross season at Houston, Texas.

With a time of 47.386 in Session 1. Ken Roczen posted the fastest time of the day – barely .052 seconds faster than Dean Wilson (47.438).

Eli Tomac (47.580) was third on the grid with Marvin Musquin (47.879) taking the fourth spot.

Meanwhile, Webb (48.315) was about midway down the order of riders who automatically lock into three Mains that make up the third and final Triple Crown event.

Kyle Chisholm was the 18th fastest and final rider to lock in. Adam Enticknap (50.120) was the first rider on the outside looking in and needed to qualify via the Last Chance Qualifier.

Last Chance Qualifier: Austin Politelli transferred easily with his 3.196 second win over Adam Enticknap. … Carlen Gardner and Charles Lefrancois rounded out the top four riders wo advance to the Main. … The action was deeper in the field. Battling for fifth, Ryan Breece clipped a tough block and was pitched from his bike. Adding injury to insult, Scott Champion ran over the rolling body of Breece.

Click here for combined qualifying results

MORE: Marvin Musquin carries momentum to Houston 

In the 250 class:

Adam Cianciarulo (47.431) edged last week’s winner Dylan Ferrandis (47.517) for fast time.

Chris Blose (48.494), RJ Hampshire (48.710) and Colt Nichols (48.790) rounded out the top five.

Nichols is looking to rebound from last week’s disappointing finish I Seattle.

Last Chance Qualifier: Vann Martin crashed off course while leading and fell to seventh. His accident handed the lead to Brandan Leith, who handily won by almost three seconds over Killian Auberson. … Mathias Jorgensen rounded out the top three. … Martin Castelo benefitted most from Martin’s fall to climb to the fourth and final transfer spot.

Click here for combined qualifying results

Qualification each week can be seen live with NBC’s Sport Gold Supercross / Motocross season pass, which can be purchased at https://www.nbcsports.com/gold.

Follow Dan Beaver on Twitter

WATCH: Red Bull F1 team completes pit stop in zero gravity

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The Red Bull Racing pit crew may have already made headlines last weekend when it completed the fastest pit stop in Formula One history, changing Max Verstappen’s tires in 1.82 seconds, but the team’s most recent stunt took their skills to new heights – quite literally.

With the help of the Russian Space agency Roscomos, a group of the team’s mechanics completed the world’s first zero-gravity pit stop, on-board a IIyushin II-76K cosmonaut training plane.

Using a 2005 BR1, the team filmed the viral video over the course of a week, enduring seven flights and about 80 parabolas – periods in which the plane climbs 45 degrees before falling again at a ballistic arch of 45 degrees, creating a period of weightlessness for approximately 22 seconds.

With such a short time frame between weightlessness periods, the car and equipment had to be both quickly and safely secured before gravity once again took effect. Each filming lasted roughly 15 seconds, and the stunt was the most physically and technically demanding activity the live demo team had ever undertaken.

“It pushed us harder than I thought it would,” said Red Bull Support Team Mechanic Joe Robinson. “You realize how much you rely on gravity when you don’t have any!

“It challenges you to think and operate in a different way – and that was brilliant. It was a once in a lifetime opportunity and honestly, I could have stayed and done it all month. It was amazing. I think it’s the coolest, most fun thing the Live Demo team has ever done with a show car.”

Though Red Bull was the first team to perform a pit stop in zero gravity, surprisingly Red Bull was not the first team to put a car through zero gravity. In 1999, McLaren driver David Coulthard and his car experienced zero gravity as part of a promotion for then-sponsor West Cigarettes.

Follow Michael Eubanks on Twitter