Takuma Sato dominates Barber Motorsports Park on way to IndyCar win

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Takuma Sato won the Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama for his fourth career series victory after leading the field to green from the pole and dominating the race.

Even with a comfortable lead, he was giving it his all during the final laps. With less than five laps remaining, Sato ran off course and knocked a diffuser from the bottom of his Honda, but if anything, it made him a little faster. He had an off course excursion in that same turn complex (Turn 8/9) during Friday’s practice.

Over the course of those last five laps, Sato extended his lead from a little under two seconds to a 2.3874-second advantage over Scott Dixon, who was under heavy pressure from Sebastien Bourdais.

“This is because of the team,” Sato said at the conclusion of the race on NBCSN. “They made a fantastic effort. That car was superb – red tire, black tire, I didn’t have to worry about it.”

Sato credited his teammate for helping him find the setup that allowed him to dominate.

“This morning warmup helped a lot. Thank you very much to Graham Rahal, my teammate. We (found) a problem and he found a very good setup and I installed it.”

Sato’s dominant weekend vaulted him 10 position to third in the standings from 13th entering the race.

For Dixon – who remains winless at Barber – it was his sixth second-place finish at the track.

Dixon finished second to Josef Newgarden in 2017, Ryan Hunter-Reay in 2013, Will Power in 2011 and 2012, and Helio Castroneves in 2010.

“It was really tough,” Dixon said. “We had a lot of [tire degradation]. We started off and we could push really hard and be really quick and close the gap – even on some of those crossovers in the pits, we were able to hone in on Graham and Sato early on in the race.

“But the last 10 laps were really miserable. On that last run, I tried to hold a steady gap to Taku.”

Dixon admitted to being a little annoyed with all of his second-place finishes before the race, but given how this protected his position in the standings, he was anything but annoyed this week. Dixon leap frogged Colton Herta to land second in the points.

“Catching (Dixon) was no problem,” Bourdais said. “It was the push to pass in a lap and I was in his rear wing. The problem was both times I did, as soon as I got behind him, it started to slip and slide. The tires are not that fresh anymore at that point.”

Coming off back-to-back wins and three victories in the last four Barber races, Josef Newgarden finished fourth. Alexander Rossi rounded out the top five.

The only caution of the day didn’t wave until Lap 58, but to make up for lost time, it was for multiple issues. Max Chilton crashed at pit entry when he ran up on a slowing Tony Kanaan – who made a late entry to pit lane because Rahal stalled on track in Turn 8.

Losing power on track put a period to a long and frustrating day for the outside pole sitter.

Rahal had a throttle issue on Lap 19 before losing power for good on Lap 58.

“About Lap 3, the throttle began to stick,” Rahal said on NBCSN. “I tried to make it hang on; we did maybe 15 laps that way. Finally, it was going to put me in a gravel trap or something. It was hanging on way to much. And then the car died. Completely shut off. We had this in qualifying, luckily it was on my cool down lap from the lap I went P2. These two have to be interconnected.”

Colton Herta retained the lead in the Rookie of the Year standings despite a disappointing day.

He went from first in the most recent race to last (24th) at Barber with a fuel pickup problem on Lap 33 after experiencing an engine issue early in the race.

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WHO HAD A GOOD RACE: Marcus Ericsson was the highest finishing rookie of the race in seventh. … Felix Rosenqvist finished 10th to score his second top-10 of the season. … James Hinchcliffe rebounded from a 16th-place finish at Circuit of the Americas to finish sixth.

WHO HAD A BAD RACE: Ed Jones got off to a strong start – too strong as it turned out. When the green flag waved over a slow start, he jumped the field advancing from 21st to fourth before Turn 1 Jones was penalized with a drive through penalty and never recovered. He finished 19th. … Max Chilton ran out of room on the pit road entry and nosed into the Turn 16 wall. He lost two laps while they pulled him back on track to finish 22nd.

QUOTE OF THE DAY: “Oh my gosh, what a delightful day. What a delightful day yesterday. I’m sorry about Graham. Something went to sleep on him, but Takuma Sato – fantastic afternoon.” – David Letterman, team owner of Rahal, Letterman, Lanigan Racing.

WHAT’S NEXT: IndyCar heads to Long Beach, Calif. for next Sunday’s Grand Prix of Long Beach on NBCSN (coverage begins at 4 p.m. ET).

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NHRA: Funny Car driver J.R. Todd looks to snap slump, make history at U.S. Nationals

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In addition to being the most gratifying achievement of his NHRA drag racing career, winning the 2018 NHRA Funny Car championship was also the hardest thing J.R. Todd has ever done.

That is, until he tried to defend the title in 2019 – which has now become the hardest thing Todd has done behind the wheel.

After winning a career-best six wins en route to his title last season, Todd has had a rough campaign in the first 17 races of the current season, having earned just one win (Las Vegas) and two runner-up finishes.

In addition, he’s failed to make it out of the first round six times, and was stopped in the quarter-finals eight other times.

And as he prepares for next week’s Chevrolet Performance U.S. Nationals at Lucas Oil Raceway in suburban Indianapolis – the biggest race of the season – the 37-year-old Todd is mired in a difficult slump. Since losing to Ron Capps in the final round at Richmond, Todd has dropped from second to eighth in the Funny Car standings, unable to get past the second round of the nine subsequent events.

That’s why Todd is hoping for a major turnaround at the U.S. Nationals, the final qualifying race for the upcoming six-race Countdown to the Championship playoffs.

J.R. Todd (Photo: NHRA).

A massive 416 points (the equivalent of more than three wins points-wise) out of first place, Todd needs to start a big comeback if he hopes to do well in the playoffs, and the U.S. Nationals is the perfect place for him to do so. Todd comes into this year’s race having won the last two Funny Car crowns at Indy in 2017 and 2018.

If he can make it three in a row, Todd will make NHRA history. To date, only two drivers – Top Fuel greats “Big Daddy” Don Garlits and Tony Schumacher – have won three in a row at Indianapolis. But no Funny Car driver has ever done so, not John Force, Kenny Bernstein, Don Prudhomme or anyone else.

“That’s some pretty elite company right there with Big Daddy and Tony Schumacher,” Todd told NBC Sports. “Really you try not to think about things like that and just focus on the mission at hand – and that’s to win the race.

“When you do that, then you can enjoy all the accolades that come with it. I have the two trophies that I can look at every day – and it’s an awesome reminder of what we’ve done. It was a dream of mine as a kid to go there and race in the U.S. Nationals as a professional someday and to have won it is still kind of a surreal feeling.”

Todd, who lives in nearby Lawrenceburg, Indiana, wants to be the first Funny Car driver to pull off that achievement — and at his home track, to boot.

“It’s the biggest race of the year and the one that everyone wants to win,” Todd said. “To go back there and win there three years in a row would be pretty special.

“For me, it’s the race I grew up going to as a kid. I have a lot of family and friends that go there. I live five minutes from the track, so it means everything to me.”

In a sense, his situation this season is kind of deja vu for Todd. Last season, he won two races earlier in the season (Las Vegas and Houston), then went into a slump much like the one he’s currently in.

But starting with last September’s win at Indianapolis, Todd went on to win four of the final seven races of the season — including three in the playoffs — to motor on to the championship.

What makes Todd’s success at Indy all the more unique is that while he’s a long-time drag racer, he only switched to Funny Car prior to the 2017 season. That means in just two seasons, the former Top Fuel pilot has not only twice won the sport’s biggest race, but also the championship.

The team Todd races for, Kalitta Motorsports, has a history of starting to hit its stride just before the playoffs begin in Funny Car. From 2014 through 2018, the organization has won 13 Funny Car races beginning with the second-to-last regular season race at Brainerd, Minnesota through the six playoff races. That’s 13 of 40 races, roughly 33% of the races that NHRA has won.

In addition to Todd’s two U.S. Nationals wins, Team Kalitta also won the Funny Car event in 2014 with now-retired driver Alexis DeJoria.

I knew coming over to drive the DHL Toyota Camry that we would have some good opportunities to win races,” Todd said. “For whatever reason, it seems like we pick up a lot of momentum at that time of year. We’re hoping we can keep that trend going this year.”

In a sense, the U.S. Nationals – the 18th and final regular season race of the overall 24-race NHRA schedule – are to the NHRA what the Daytona 500 is to NASCAR or the Indianapolis 500 is to IndyCar.

“It sets the tone for the next six races,” Todd said of the playoffs. “The U.S. Nationals are a marathon. It’s the one race where everyone brings out their best stuff because it’s so important.  So much of that preparation then carries over into the Countdown.

“If you ask drivers that haven’t won Indy before, I think they’d trade pretty much any win for that one.”

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