INDYCAR Photo by Chris Owens
INDYCAR Photo by Chris Owens

Alonso, McLaren test IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway on Tuesday

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Two-time Formula One World Champion Fernando Alonso returned to a high-speed oval on Tuesday at Texas Motor Speedway. It was the first time he’s been on an oval in an Indy car since the 101st Indianapolis 500 in 2017.

Alonso and the McLaren IndyCar team had a private test at the 1.5-mile, high-banked oval in Fort Worth, Texas as the team prepares for the 103rd Indianapolis 500 on May 26.

“It was great obviously,” Alonso said Tuesday from Texas. “It’s only the first couple of laps with the car. We are taking care of everything slowly with the speed. I drove in Barber (Motorsports Park in Birmingham, Ala.) last year in the Indy car, but it’s good to be back on the oval with a very specific setup — this car that turns left self-steering a little bit.

“It’s some weird feeling for me to try to get used to with the speedway especially with a lot of banking on the corner, especially Turns 3 and 4. It’s different than Indianapolis but hopefully a good preparation for us.”

TMS is a high-banked oval compared to the flat, four-cornered 2.5-mile Indianapolis Motor Speedway. It was a unique experience to the Formula One great from Spain compared to his first oval race in the Indy 500 in 2017.

“It’s just about getting comfort in the car,” Alonso said. “It’s a new car, new team so in terms of seat position, headrest, pedals, steering wheel preferences I think all these things we can start now the work.

“I think it is quite important to set up everything as a team, who does what in the team, also the pit wall. The facility is completely new for everyone (and) try to solve as many problems here and at the open test on the 24th(of April at Indianapolis Motor Speedway) and getting ready for the Indianapolis 500.”

Because it was a private team test, speeds were not released. This was also a test designed to help the McLaren team familiarize themselves with the Dallara/Chevrolet combination. In 2017, they were a partner team with Andretti Autosport and used a Honda.

This year, McLaren is getting engineering and technical advice from Carlin.

The aerodynamic rules have changed since 2017 and Alonso was asked to compare how the universal aero kit handles on the oval.

“So far it’s too early to say because I am not up to speed,” he said. “I guess listening to everyone in the last year I think there will be less downforce. They can be more trickier to drive, especially followings. Today’s not a problem because I am alone. But I guess it’s going to be challenging, especially this year I am not with the Andretti, let’s say, environment.

“It’s all by ourselves this year.”

Alonso and McLaren will participate in an “Open Test” at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on April 24, along with the other teams and drivers entered in the 103rd Indianapolis 500.

Keating stripped of Le Mans GTE-Am win; No. 68 Ganassi entry also disqualified

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FIA stewards announced Monday that two Ford GT entries have been disqualified from this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans, including the GTE-Am class-winning No. 85 entry from privateer Keating Motorsports.

Also DQ’d was the factory No. 68 Chip Ganassi Racing entry of Joey Hand, Dirk Mueller and Sebastien Bourdais, which initially finished fourth in the GTE-Pro class.

Both entries were found in violation of fuel capacity regulations, with the No. 85 entry also failing to meet the minimum refueling time during pit stops.

The refueling system on the No. 85 entry, driven by Ben Keating, Jeroen Bleekemolen and Felipe Fraga, measured a time of 44.4 seconds during a stop, just shy of the minimum required time of 45 seconds.

As a result, the team was initially issued a 55.2-second post-race penalty by officials, which elevated the No. 56 Team Project 1 Porsche 911 RSR of Joerg Bergmeister, Patrick Lindsey, and Egidio Perfetti to the class win.

The time penalty was calculated by the difference in the refueling time (0.6 seconds) multiplied by the amount of pit stops made by the team (23), then multiplied by four.

The No. 85 entry was set to finish second in class, but then received an outright DQ after its fuel capacity was also revealed to be 0.1 liters above the maximum permitted capacity of 96 liters.

As for Ganassi’s No. 68 entry, it was found to have a fuel capacity of 97.83 liters, which is above the maximum allowed capacity of 97 liters for the GTE-Pro Fords.

The No. 67 Ford of Andy Priaulx, Harry Tincknell, and Jonathan Bomarito subsequently moves up to fourth, and the No. 69 Ford of Scott Dixon, Ryan Briscoe and Richard Westbrook moves up to fifth.

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