Will Power dominates Grand Prix of Portland en route to 37th career win

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PORTLAND, Oregon – Will Power may not be in the hunt for the NTT IndyCar Series championship anymore, but he still had a great reason to celebrate Sunday afternoon when he won the Grand Prix of Portland.

Power took the lead of the race on lap 52 of the race at Portland International Raceway when Scott Dixon’s car came to a halt due to a battery issue.

Power then went on to lead the remainder of the race through the checkered flag, holding off Felix Rosenqvist in a late-race restart.

“It was a pretty tough race,” Power told NBC Sports following his victory. “I had Rosenqvist’s constant pressure.

“There at the end we could slowly pull away and I felt like ‘oh yeah, this is going to be good,’ and then a yellow flag [came out] and I was like ‘oh, come on man!'”

“But, [I was] determined to get a good restart. Just so stoked to be back again in victory lane. It helps the teams, it helps the other guys [teammates Josef Newgarden and Simon Pagenaud] take some points away.”

With the 37th victory of his career in the books, Power is now tied with Sebastien Bourdais for sixth on the all-time wins list.

Rosenqvist maintained his position in second through the checkered flag, while Alexander Rossi finished third.

“It just ultimately wasn’t an awesome day for us, but it was still generally good, I guess,” Rossi said. “Regardless, it’s great to be on the podium.”

Rossi now moves back up into second place in the overall point standings, 41 points behind leader Newgarden with one race remaining in the 2019 season.

Polesitter Colton Herta finished fourth while Newgarden finished fifth.

“I wish we could have been a little higher up but starting 13th, but I think we can’t be disappointed with how things turned out,” Newgarden said.

Spencer Pigot finished sixth, while Pagenaud finished the race seventh. He now sits third in the point standings, 42 points behind Newgarden and 1 point behind Rossi.

Matheus Leist, Sebastien Bourdais and Charlie Kimball rounded out the top 10.

Several drivers retired from the race, including James Hinchcliffe, Conor Daly, Zach Veach, and Graham Rahal – all of whom would be collected in a multi-car accident on lap 1.

Entering the infamous Turn 1 chicane, Rahal miscalculated his braking and made contact with Veach, sending Veach’s car into Hinchcliffe’s No. 5 machine. Rahal then made contact with Conor Daly.

After retiring from the race, Rahal took responsibility for causing the accident.

“I’m disappointed in myself for the first corner incident, and sorry to those who’s races it affected,” Rahal tweeted.

“The last 2 years have been certainly ‘trying’ and that came to a head today. Contrary to every twitter troll on the planets claims, I certainly never intend to do that.”

The NTT IndyCar Series now heads to WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca for the championship-deciding race, the Firestone Grand Prix of Monterey. Live race coverage begins Sunday, September 22 at 2:30 p.m. ET on NBC.

Click here for full race results

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WATCH: Red Bull F1 team completes pit stop in zero gravity

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The Red Bull Racing pit crew may have already made headlines last weekend when it completed the fastest pit stop in Formula One history, changing Max Verstappen’s tires in 1.82 seconds, but the team’s most recent stunt took their skills to new heights – quite literally.

With the help of the Russian Space agency Roscomos, a group of the team’s mechanics completed the world’s first zero-gravity pit stop, on-board a IIyushin II-76K cosmonaut training plane.

Using a 2005 BR1, the team filmed the viral video over the course of a week, enduring seven flights and about 80 parabolas – periods in which the plane climbs 45 degrees before falling again at a ballistic arch of 45 degrees, creating a period of weightlessness for approximately 22 seconds.

With such a short time frame between weightlessness periods, the car and equipment had to be both quickly and safely secured before gravity once again took effect. Each filming lasted roughly 15 seconds, and the stunt was the most physically and technically demanding activity the live demo team had ever undertaken.

“It pushed us harder than I thought it would,” said Red Bull Support Team Mechanic Joe Robinson. “You realize how much you rely on gravity when you don’t have any!

“It challenges you to think and operate in a different way – and that was brilliant. It was a once in a lifetime opportunity and honestly, I could have stayed and done it all month. It was amazing. I think it’s the coolest, most fun thing the Live Demo team has ever done with a show car.”

Though Red Bull was the first team to perform a pit stop in zero gravity, surprisingly Red Bull was not the first team to put a car through zero gravity. In 1999, McLaren driver David Coulthard and his car experienced zero gravity as part of a promotion for then-sponsor West Cigarettes.

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