2019 NHRA champions: Hight, Torrence, Enders, Hines

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Robert Hight further cemented himself as one of drag racing’s all-time greats when he clinched his third career NHRA Funny Car championship in Sunday’s Auto Club NHRA Finals in Ponoma, California.

Having previously won the Funny Car title in 2009 and 2017, Hight is well-aware of what it feels like to be crowned the champion. But make no mistake, for Hight, winning title No. 3 is just as fun as winning the first one.

“It’s pretty amazing,” Hight told NBC Sports. “I honestly feel that this is probably the most special championship that I’ve won, because of how we performed all year long. From start to finish, we’ve had the best car, and we just had consistency and really did well all year long.”

Indeed, Hight was incredibly consistent in 2019, most notably during the six-race Countdown to the Championship playoffs, which he led from start to finish.

With his third title forever enshrined in the NHRA record books, Hight – who has 52 career Funny Car victories – has now joined a very special club featuring some of the best racers in NHRA history.

“It’s pretty cool to me that now I’m in a pretty elite group with more than two championships. Kenny Bernstein, Raymond Beadle, John Force, and Don Prudhomme are the only ones with more than two. It’s still hard for me to wrap my arms around that my name is on that list. It’s pretty amazing.”

Of course, Hight wasn’t the only driver to celebrate in the winner’s circle Sunday. He was also joined by Top Fuel champion Steve Torrence, Pro Stock champ Erica Enders, and Pro Stock Motorcycle champion Andrew Hines.

Let’s break down each of the four pro classes from Sunday’s finals:

In Funny Car: The final round of the afternoon may have not gone exactly as planned for Hight, as his Auto Club Camaro quit on him during his burnout, handing the victory to Jack Beckman.

Beckman’s 3.920-second, 323.27-mph solo pass effortlessly gave the 2012 Funny Car champion his second and final victory of the 2019 season.

But for Hight, winning the final race of the 2019 season wasn’t a big deal; he had already done everything he needed to clinch his second title in three seasons with his win over Matt Hagan in the semifinals.

Although Hight had already been crowned World Champion twice prior, the California native had never won the title in such dominant fashion as he did in 2019.

 

“This is a dream year for me,” Hight said. “I’ve had years where I led all year and we lost in the Countdown. I’ve had years where we were terrible until we got to the Countdown and we ended up winning a championship. I think the results have showed from start to finish. This is what I’ve dreamed about, having a year where you’ve got the most wins and you’ve been in the lead all year.”

In Top Fuel: Another year meant another dominant performance by Torrence, who won his second consecutive Top Fuel title despite losing to Richie Crampton in the semifinals. Torrence entered the final race weekend of the year with a narrow lead over Brittany Force in the Top Fuel standings, whom he beat 3.74 to 3.77 in the second round of eliminations.

After defeating the 2017 champion, all Torrence needed to do was not cross the centerline in his semifinal versus Crampton to mathematically clinch the title, a task he easily accomplished.

“It’s been really special to be part of a team like ours; it’s not the driver who really does anything,” Torrence said. “The guys who work on this car – Richard Hogan, Bobby Lagana, and the rest of the Capco boys – are the ones who deserve all of the credit.

“It’s special to win one championship but to be able to win two and do it back to back, I can’t thank everyone enough.”

Though it was all smiles for Torrence following the conclusion of Sunday’s racing action, the 36-year-old Texan was visibly upset following his round one victory over Cameron Ferre.

Torrence took offense at the way Ferre staged his dragster prior to the round, and shoved Ferre in the face when both drivers excited their cars following the run.

Following his round two victory over Force, Torrence apologized for his actions.

“I had to get my head out of my butt,” Torrence said. “I apologize to each and every fan out there, everybody who has supported me. I got to go find Cameron and apologize to him.

“Tensions are high, and there’s a lot of crap going on. I’ve been in his shoes where you go up there to win and you might not have the best car but you do everything you can on the starting line. With everything going on – and racing for the kid at home who lost his life – there’s no excuse to act that way. I apologize. I’m grateful for the team, and it kind of just soils the day. I’m sorry to every one of you guys.”

In the final Top Fuel round of the day, Doug Kalitta defeated Crampton to collect his third victory of the season, and his 47th overall. Kalitta ended the season second to Torrence in the overall points standings.

“It was a fun day for sure,” Kalitta said. “I was really proud of the effort we put in today but three rounds was tough to make up, but we gave it all we could, so, obviously, it’s still on my list to win a championship.

“There are a lot of people who would love to see me win a championship and I would love nothing more than to get it done.”

In Pro Stock: By defeating Chris McGaha in the second round of Pro Stock eliminations, Enders won her third career Pro Stock title, and first since 2015.

But to get to the second round, Enders first had to defeat Greg Anderson, who strategically qualified 15th so he could face her in the first round in attempt to help his K.B. Racing teammates Jason Line and Bo Butner with their championship chances.

But despite having a quicker reaction time at the line, Anderson was defeated by Enders at the quarter mile mark, as she quickly shifted through the gears to beat Anderson at the finish line.

“The first one was just epic in the fashion that we did it,” Enders said. “The second one we knocked them out before Vegas was over. This one symbolizes a lot because of what my team has gone through and what I’ve gone through personally. Obviously the other championships meant a lot to me, too, but this one is special.”

In the class finals, Jeg Coughlin defeated Fernando Cuadra by 0.33-second to collect his second and final victory of 2019. Coughlin finished second overall in the point standings.

In Pro Stock Motorcycle: Hines’ hopes of winning a sixth championship were placed in limbo when the Hoosier fouled out in his first round. But luckily for Hines, title challengers Jerry Savoie and Matt Smith were unable to win the event, with both being defeated by eventual winner Jianna Salinas. 

It was the first career win for the 22-year-old rookie, and it came in her first final round.

Thus, Hines was able to maintain his point lead and win his first title since 2015. 

“This is a day that will live in fear for me for I don’t know how long,” said Hines after finally being declared the champion. “In the first round, I pulled a maneuver that I’ve done too many times in the past when I rolled backward out of the beams. I can’t thank my team enough for supporting me all day long. My Harley-Davidson team, that’s what they do best. I was so disappointed in what I did today, but we persevered all year to get those Mello Yello points and win the championship. I love my guys, and I love everything about this.”

The 2020 NHRA Mello Yello Drag Racing Series season will kick off with the Lucas Oil NHRA Winternationals Feb. 6-9 at Auto Club Raceway at Pomona.

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FINAL FINISHING ORDER:

TOP FUEL:
1. Doug Kalitta; 2. Richie Crampton; 3. Steve Torrence; 4. Leah Pritchett; 5. Brittany Force; 6. Shawn Reed; 7. Justin Ashley; 8. Jordan Vandergriff; 9. Scott Palmer; 10. Cameron Ferre; 11. Austin Prock; 12. Billy Torrence; 13. Clay Millican; 14. Terry McMillen; 15. Antron Brown; 16. Mike Salinas.
FUNNY CAR:
1. Jack Beckman; 2. Robert Hight; 3. Matt Hagan; 4. Blake Alexander; 5. Shawn Langdon; 6. J.R. Todd; 7. Steven Densham; 8. Ron Capps; 9. Cruz Pedregon; 10. Bob Tasca III; 11. Tommy Johnson Jr.; 12. Jonnie Lindberg; 13. John Force; 14. Jeff Arend; 15. Tim Wilkerson; 16. John Hale.
PRO STOCK:
1. Jeg Coughlin; 2. Fernando Cuadra; 3. Bo Butner; 4. Erica Enders; 5. Chris McGaha; 6. Aaron Stanfield; 7. Jason Line; 8. Steve Graham; 9. Greg Anderson; 10. Alex Laughlin; 11. Deric Kramer; 12. Matt Hartford; 13. Shane Tucker; 14. Joey Grose; 15. Kenny Delco; 16. Val Smeland.
PRO STOCK MOTORCYCLE:
1. Jianna Salinas; 2. Jerry Savoie; 3. Karen Stoffer; 4. Matt Smith; 5. Angelle Sampey; 6. Ryan Oehler; 7. Hector Arana Jr; 8. Steve Johnson; 9. Eddie Krawiec; 10. Scotty Pollacheck; 11. Hector Arana; 12. Angie Smith; 13. Freddie Camarena; 14. Kelly Clontz; 15. Katie Sullivan; 16. Andrew Hines.
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FINAL ROUND RESULTS:
TOP FUEL: Doug Kalitta, 3.716 seconds, 332.67 mph def. Richie Crampton, 4.884 seconds, 154.28 mph.
FUNNY CAR: Jack Beckman, Dodge Charger, 3.920, 323.27 def. Robert Hight, Chevy Camaro, Broke.
PRO STOCK: Jeg Coughlin, Chevy Camaro, 6.558, 210.54 def. Fernando Cuadra, Camaro, 6.604, 209.72.
PRO STOCK MOTORCYCLE: Jianna Salinas, Suzuki, 7.464, 180.81 def. Jerry Savoie, Suzuki, Broke.
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FINAL ROUND-BY-ROUND RESULTS:
TOP FUEL: ROUND ONE — Jordan Vandergriff, 3.721, 329.50 def. Austin Prock, 4.140, 245.09; Doug Kalitta, 3.740, 328.38 def. Terry McMillen, 5.811, 112.50; Richie Crampton, 4.204, 260.46 def. Mike Salinas, Broke; Justin Ashley, 4.364, 183.44 def. Clay Millican, 4.434, 181.86; Leah Pritchett, 3.753, 319.90 def. Scott Palmer, 3.813, 312.50; Steve Torrence, 3.734, 327.82 def. Cameron Ferre, 4.040, 294.82; Shawn Reed, 4.274, 217.11 def. Billy Torrence, 4.360, 241.07; Brittany Force, 4.075, 218.41 def. Antron Brown, 6.601, 114.89;
QUARTERFINALS — Crampton, 3.796, 322.81 def. Reed, 3.865, 281.77; Pritchett, 3.748, 323.12 def. Vandergriff, 18.760, 59.83; Kalitta, 4.068, 245.49 def. Ashley, 4.705, 157.74; S. Torrence, 3.749, 326.48 def. Force, 3.776, 302.41;
SEMIFINALS — Crampton, 3.762, 327.51 def. S. Torrence, 3.751, 324.59; Kalitta, 3.730, 331.85 def. Pritchett, 3.908, 302.08;
FINAL — Kalitta, 3.716, 332.67 def. Crampton, 4.884, 154.28.
FUNNY CAR: ROUND ONE — Steven Densham, Ford Mustang, 5.380, 135.29 def. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 7.949, 129.11; Shawn Langdon, Toyota Camry, 4.013, 322.27 def. Jeff Arend, Chevy Monte Carlo, 5.410, 142.29; Jack Beckman, Dodge Charger, 3.946, 321.65 def. John Hale, Chevy Impala, 13.434, 39.58; Matt Hagan, Charger, 4.114, 275.11 def. Jonnie Lindberg, Mustang, 4.998, 162.98; Blake Alexander, Mustang, 3.981, 318.69 def. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 4.056, 294.43; Robert Hight, Chevy Camaro, 3.945, 327.82 def. John Force, Camaro, 5.234, 141.97; J.R. Todd, Camry, 3.974, 323.19 def. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 4.101, 258.02; Ron Capps, Charger, 3.949, 326.00 def. Cruz Pedregon, Charger, 3.982, 321.58;
QUARTERFINALS — Alexander, 4.157, 279.27 def. Densham, 4.522, 294.69; Beckman, 3.958, 324.20 def. Todd, 4.005, 318.47; Hight, 3.976, 324.75 def. Langdon, 4.004, 315.12; Hagan, 4.005, 323.04 def. Capps, 6.338, 83.99;
SEMIFINALS — Hight, 3.977, 324.59 def. Hagan, 4.015, 326.95; Beckman, 3.956, 320.28 def. Alexander, 4.020, 308.85;
FINAL — Beckman, 3.920, 323.27 def. Hight, Broke.
PRO STOCK: ROUND ONE — Aaron Stanfield, Chevy Camaro, 6.632, 209.23 def. Kenny Delco, Camaro, 7.515, 139.26; Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.602, 209.56 def. Deric Kramer, Camaro, 6.598, 209.23; Fernando Cuadra, Camaro, 6.601, 209.59 def. Matt Hartford, Camaro, 6.599, 209.43; Steve Graham, Camaro, 6.610, 208.97 def. Alex Laughlin, Camaro, 6.590, 210.01; Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.573, 211.03 def. Val Smeland, Camaro, 7.735, 132.49; Jason Line, Camaro, 6.562, 210.05 def. Shane Tucker, Camaro, 6.650, 208.78; Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.570, 210.41 def. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.575, 210.31; Jeg Coughlin, Camaro, 6.570, 210.28 def. Joey Grose, Camaro, 6.670, 207.82;
QUARTERFINALS — Butner, 6.595, 210.80 def. Graham, 14.023, 62.91; Coughlin, 6.599, 209.49 def. Stanfield, 6.611, 209.56; Enders, 6.597, 209.69 def. McGaha, 6.593, 210.08; F. Cuadra, 6.617, 207.40 def. Line, 8.371, 110.36;
SEMIFINALS — F. Cuadra, 6.586, 209.33 def. Enders, 6.612, 210.08; Coughlin, 6.588, 209.98 def. Butner, 6.582, 210.64;
FINAL — Coughlin, 6.558, 210.54 def. F. Cuadra, 6.604, 209.72.
PRO STOCK MOTORCYCLE: ROUND ONE — Ryan Oehler, 6.932, 193.49 def. Scotty Pollacheck, 6.945, 194.60; Angelle Sampey, Harley-Davidson, 6.886, 193.65 def. Eddie Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 6.893, 195.22; Hector Arana Jr, 6.934, 193.82 def. Hector Arana, 6.974, 194.72; Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 6.888, 195.05 def. Kelly Clontz, Suzuki, Foul – Red Light; Jianna Salinas, Suzuki, 6.987, 187.29 def. Andrew Hines, Harley-Davidson, Foul – Red Light; Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.903, 190.94 def. Freddie Camarena, Suzuki, 7.027, 193.57; Jerry Savoie, Suzuki, 6.912, 191.87 def. Angie Smith, 7.022, 189.66; Matt Smith, 6.885, 196.70 def. Katie Sullivan, Suzuki, 7.119, 187.44;
QUARTERFINALS — Savoie, 6.860, 194.21 def. Arana Jr, Foul – Red Light; Salinas, 7.062, 184.55 def. Johnson, 13.432, 58.11; Stoffer, 6.894, 195.51 def. Sampey, 6.907, 193.96; M. Smith, 6.893, 195.90 def. Oehler, 6.944, 194.55;
SEMIFINALS — Salinas, 7.024, 186.85 def. M. Smith, 8.969, 97.85; Savoie, 6.855, 195.79 def. Stoffer, Foul – Red Light;
FINAL — Salinas, 7.464, 180.81 def. Savoie, Broke.
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FINAL SEASON POINT STANDINGS:
TOP FUEL: 1. Steve Torrence, 2,607; 2. Doug Kalitta, 2,604; 3. Brittany Force, 2,555; 4. Leah Pritchett, 2,474; 5. Billy Torrence, 2,458; 6. Richie Crampton, 2,399; 7. Mike Salinas, 2,381; 8. Austin Prock, 2,379; 9. Antron Brown, 2,329; 10. Clay Millican, 2,300.
FUNNY CAR: 1. Robert Hight, 2,637; 2. Jack Beckman, 2,629; 3. Matt Hagan, 2,563; 4. John Force, 2,471; 5. Bob Tasca III, 2,446; 6. Ron Capps, 2,414; 7. J.R. Todd, 2,391; 8. Tommy Johnson Jr., 2,360; 9. Shawn Langdon, 2,358; 10. Tim Wilkerson, 2,283.
PRO STOCK: 1. Erica Enders, 2,635; 2. Jeg Coughlin, 2,614; 3. Bo Butner, 2,524; 4. Jason Line, 2,495; 5. Matt Hartford, 2,448; 6. Deric Kramer, 2,409; 7. Greg Anderson, 2,408; 8. Alex Laughlin, 2,345; 9. Chris McGaha, 2,329; 10. Val Smeland, 2,203.
PRO STOCK MOTORCYCLE: 1. Andrew Hines, 2,599; 2. Jerry Savoie, 2,573; 3. Matt Smith, 2,553; 4. Karen Stoffer, 2,534; 5. Eddie Krawiec, 2,474; 6. Hector Arana Jr, 2,389; 7. Angelle Sampey, 2,381; 8. Angie Smith, 2,281; 9. Ryan Oehler, 2,271; 10. Hector Arana, 2,209.

Extreme E reveals competition format for its global races next season

Extreme E
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Extreme E, a new series that will raise awareness about climate change by racing electric SUVs around the world, unveiled its competition format Friday.

The five-race environmentally conscious series will begin next season with races held in Senegal, Saudi Arabia, Nepal, Greenland and Brazil.

Chip Ganassi Racing and Andretti Autosport are among the eight teams that will race in the series. Each team will have a male and female driver who alternate in each event.

ELECTRIC APPEAL: Why Ganassi is going to the Extreme E

In the details provided Friday, the two-day events will feature two qualifying races Saturday and two semifinals and a final round Sunday. Each race is two laps: One driven by the male driver and the other by the female. Results are based on finishes, not times.

The first semifinal is slotted with Saturday’s top four qualifiers, and the top three finishers advance to the final. The second semifinal (also known as the “Crazy Race”) will feature the last four qualifiers with the winner advancing to the final.

Click here to see the details of Extreme E’s sporting format.

Here’s the release from Extreme E:

29 May, London: Extreme E, the revolutionary electric off-road racing series, has outlined the race format for its five-event adventure to some of the most formidable, remote and spectacular locations across the globe, starting early 2021.

The series has devised an innovative format unlike any other, likened to a Star Wars Pod Racing meets Dakar Rally, which is designed to break the mould in motorsport with all-action, short, sharp wheel-to-wheel racing, world-class drivers and teams, the cutting-edge ODYSSEY 21 electric SUV and its stunning, formidable environments, all firmly in focus.

Each race, which will be known as an X Prix, will incorporate two laps over a distance of approximately 16 kilometres. Four teams, with two drivers – one male, one female – completing a lap apiece in-car, will race head-to-head in each race over the two-day event.

Qualifying takes place on day one to determine the top four runners who will progress through into Semi-Final 1 and the bottom four competitors who will go on to take part in Semi-Final 2: the unique ‘Crazy Race’.

The Crazy Race will be a tooth-and-nail, all-or-nothing fight, with only the quickest team progressing into the Final, while the top three will make it through from Semi-Final 1. The winner of the Final – the fastest combination of team, drivers, car and engineers over the epic two-day battle – will then be crowned the X Prix Winner.

Another innovative feature is the Hyperdrive. This will award an additional boost of speed to the team who performs the longest jump on the first jump of each race. Hyperdrive power can be used by that team at any point in the race.

This initial format is designed to incorporate eight teams, and can be adapted to accommodate additional entries.

Teams will field one male and one female driver, promoting gender equality and a level playing field amongst competitors. Each driver will complete one lap behind the wheel, with a changeover incorporated into the race format.

The teams will determine which driver goes first to best suit their strategy and driver order selections are made confidentially, with competitors kept in the dark as to other teams’ choices until the cars reach the start-line. Contests between males and females will therefore be ensured.

X Prix circuits will also incorportate natural challenges that will leave viewers at the edge of their seats, and drivers and teams will be pushed right to the limits of their abilities; with hazards to navigate and defeat such as extreme gradients, jumps, banks, berms, pits, dunes and water splashes.

Alejandro Agag, Extreme E Founder and CEO, said: “Extreme E is a championship like nothing else that has come before in sport. Its goal and objective is to accelerate innovation and tackle climate change head on using transportation.

“Creating this innovative sporting format, which we’re likening to Star Wars Pod Racing meets Dakar Rally, is vital in order to engage the next generation of motorsport fans. We hope our fans will enjoy the short, sharp, wheel-to-wheel racing this format has been built around, and with our high performance electric vehicle, driver changeover, the Hyperdrive feature, and the Crazy Race qualification format, there is plenty to watch out for, and many chances for positions to change hands, Our races really will go right to the wire.”

Extreme E’s cutting-edge 550-horsepower, ODYSSEY 21, incorporates a number of innovations to enable it to cope with all the rigours of racing over the toughest terrain, where no car has raced before. The battery-electric, 400kw (550hp), 1650-kilogram, 2.3-metre wide E-SUV is bespoke from the ground up. Capable of firing from 0-62mph in 4.5 seconds, at gradients of up to 130 percent.

It is made up of a common package of standardised parts, manufactured by Spark Racing Technology with a battery produced by Williams Advanced Engineering. This encompasses a niobium-reinforced steel alloy tubular frame, as well as crash structure and roll cage, whilst tyres, for both extreme winter and summer requirements, supplied by founding partner Continental Tyres.

As well as being used as platform for equality and illutstrating the capabilities of electric vehicle technology, Extreme E will highlight the impact that climate change is having on its remote race locations, using a committee of leading scientists to help bring global attention to issues such as deforestation in Brazil, rising sea levels along the West African coastline, melting Arctic icecaps in Greenland, and more.

The championship will announce further drivers, teams and partners over the coming weeks as it builds towards its early 2021 start-date apace.