Hinch
AP

Bourdais, Hinchcliffe casualties of cruel IndyCar offseason

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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Sebastien Bourdais spent a day in early November helping IndyCar iron out the wrinkles on its newest safety innovation. He’d been chosen to test the new windscreen cockpit protection because of his experience, his ability to offer technical feedback and his methodical approach in a race car.

Later that evening, the four-time series champion learned he was likely going to be fired from his job with Dale Coyne Racing. It took another two weeks for the details to be worked out between Coyne and Bourdais, who was dumped with a year remaining on his contract and too late in the free agency process to land another IndyCar ride.

Now Bourdais, tied for sixth on the all-time wins list with 37 career victories, finds himself sidelined along with James Hinchcliffe, another popular veteran who learned after the season ended that re-branded Arrow McLaren SP was replacing him despite a year left on his contract.

Both drivers are longtime fixtures in open-wheel racing and opened 2020 with zero IndyCar prospects.

“James Hinchcliffe and Sebastien Bourdais are big names in the series. They are not someone to just whisk off and forget about. It’s serious,” former Indianapolis 500 winner and series champion Ryan Hunter-Reay told The Associated Press.

The abrupt sacking of Bourdais and Hinchcliffe has made for an offseason of distasteful business decisions that has contributed to a rapidly changing landscape in a series trying to make a comeback. Hinchcliffe was replaced at McLaren by 20-year-old Patricio O’Ward; Bourdais got the boot because he failed to score a manufacturer point for Honda last season, so Honda cut Coyne’s engine funding and Coyne opted for Alex Palou, a Spaniard who brought financial backing to the program.

“It’s very European motorsports, which I hate,” said former Indy 500 winner Alexander Rossi. “I am all too familiar with it, the not honoring of contracts. But that’s motorsports.”

Both drivers have been mum on moves

This has been a particularly cruel offseason for some of IndyCar’s biggest names, who are scrambling for seats that just don’t exist. Tony Kanaan wants a 23rd and final season, but A.J. Foyt doesn’t appear to have the money to run him on anything but ovals.

Being fired is bad enough, but the timing has made it a double punch for the drivers.

“I think drivers to a certain extent, we understand we are expendable. There’s a lot of us lined up and if you are not getting the results or getting your job done, there is a line out the door of guys who will come in and try to replace you,” said Hunter-Reay. “But that’s not the issue. I think it’s when it comes down to it, there needs to be some type of business sense with integrity involved and you actually notify someone ahead of time and give them a chance to go out and find another ride.

“When it really burns us is when it happens so late like that, the music has already stopped, there’s no more chairs and you are left standing there.”

Bourdais had already been in talks with JDC Miller in sports cars to run the three IMSA endurance races, and when he lost his job with Coyne, he called team leader Christian Fittipaldi and turned that opportunity into a full-time job with the team.

“I picked up the phone and said ‘Hey dude, not looking for three races anymore,’ ” Bourdais told AP.

So the Frenchman is at Daytona International Speedway this weekend testing for the Rolex 24 at Daytona, his first race in his new job. Hinchcliffe has yet to announce anything at all, and there’s speculation he may end up doing television work for NBC Sports as he waits for a seat to open.

Both Bourdais and Hinchcliffe have said little about their firings, with Bourdais on Saturday citing confidentially clauses in his split with Coyne for how little he could reveal.

Scott Dixon surprised by moves

Bitter at how the situation played out, he insisted he’s not looking back and focused only on trying to fill his calendar with more races in 2020. He’s got a shot at landing a ride for the 24 Hours of Le Mans, where’s he a previous class winner, and wants to get back into IndyCar.

But he’s a salaried driver who does not bring sponsorship and isn’t interested in finding funding to join a smaller team just for the sake of getting back into the series. Bourdais only wishes his parting had come earlier when he might have been able to land an open seat.

“I think every contract is different so you can’t generalize things and I can’t say that Dale didn’t have an out,” Bourdais told AP. “It’s just the timing of things that was really complicated for me, it’s just the harshness of the business and financials got in the way. We’re not in a teddy bear kind of world … people do things for a reason and some are on the receiving end of bad things and you try to take the feelings out of it.

“It’s not the way you want to go, you’d like to go on your own terms and sometimes racing decides that for you.”

The late seat changes took five-time series champion Scott Dixon by surprise, as he anticipated a quiet offseason with a far more frenzied free agency to begin this summer ahead of several expiring driver contracts. Dixon thought McLaren completely botched its handling of Hinchcliffe, then the abrupt Bourdais firing only added to the chaos.

“The guys you thought were (in good shape) turned out not to be and the timing definitely sucks,” Dixon said. “Bourdais really seemed like he was blown out of the water. It’s definitely an interesting time for what we thought was going to be a quiet offseason and now it’s pretty messed up.”

Inside IndyCar’s iRacing revolution: Oliver Askew, team take it seriously

SimMetric Labs
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No laps have been turned in the NTT IndyCar Series this season, yet rookie Oliver Askew incessantly is analyzing fresh lap data with his Arrow McLaren SP team.

For the past two weeks, Askew has turned hundreds of laps in iRacing at Watkins Glen International and Barber Motorsports Park, and his support team meticulously has scoured the data in real time.

Race engineer Blair Perschbacher, assistant engineer Mike Reggio and strategist Billy Vincent are connected via all the software and timing systems that are on Askew’s real-world No. 7 Dallara-Chevrolet. After every run, numbers instantly are crunched, and Askew debriefs with his crew on improving the handling of his car in search of every fraction of a second as he would in real life.

WATCH: IndyCar iRacing Challenge, 2:30 p.m. ET Saturday, NBCSN or streaming here

The only difference is Askew is sitting inside a simulation rig housed by a 45-foot trailer in West Palm Beach, Fla., while each team member is in an Indianapolis area home.

“They basically set up their own timing stands in their living rooms,” Askew told NBCSports.com. “It’s awesome.”

It’s the new reality for IndyCar, which will play host to the second round of the IndyCar iRacing Challenge at 2:30 p.m. Saturday (NBCSN) at virtual Barber Motorsports Park.

Last Saturday, Askew started and finished fifth at Watkins Glen International, where he practiced with the advisement of his team for more than 15 hours in the SimMetric Driver Performance Labs simulator. Despite a relative sim racing newbie, Askew, 23, finished only two spots behind Will Power, who has more than 1,500 starts and 150 victories on iRacing road courses.

Askew already has practiced for more than 10 hours this week in his simulator for Barber, where he hopes to make the podium against a 29-driver field that will include many champions and winners.

“We’re taking this very seriously,” he said. “You can tell by the results at Watkins Glen. You know which drivers have built their sims properly. How much they’ve been practicing. Those are the guys who finish up front.

“I’m still trying to represent everyone. It’s cool we have the same paint scheme. We’re just trying to represent Arrow and our partners the best as possible. We know they’re all watching, and it seems the viewership is going up.”


The Jupiter, Florida, native has found an edge through his friendship with SimMetric Driver Performance Labs, which is based in nearby West Palm Beach, Florida. Askew and SimMetric CEO Greg De Giorgis met last year through mutual friends. Last year, Askew had done a few simulator sessions before winning the 2019 Indy Lights championship (and graduating to the ride with Arrow McLaren SP).

With an official simulator partnership in the Road to Indy program, SimMetric’s CXC Motion Pro II simulator travels in a trailer to racing events around the country, providing drivers with extra preparation time for the real world.

The full-motion simulator includes a motion system developed by drivers and engineers, hyrdaulic brakes and force-feedback steering system. Though at the high end for simulators available to the general public, it retails for much less than the seven-figure simulators used by auto manufacturers with race programs.

“While time in a driving simulator will never fully replace real seat time, sim seat time can go a very long way in supplementing the seat time a driver gets,” De Giorgis told NBCSports.com in an email. “With three added benefits you don’t get in the real car: Significantly lower cost per hour, no risk of bodily harm or damage to the car, and of course, no limitations on time.”

There are some limitations for how much Askew can practice, though. A schedule was set up last week so the team, Askew and De Giorgis (who helps run the simulator and maintain communications with the team) could work together while also maintaining self-isolation with their families.

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The trailer with the simulator is parked indoors at the Riviera Beach, Florida, shop of Extreme Velocity Motorsports, which also has an unofficial affiliation with SimMetric.

“We’re practicing social distancing and making sure the trailer and everything is clean,” Askew said. “We’re taking that very seriously. It’s still a job for me, so I need to get what I can out of it.”

He’s gotten a lot from it despite a lack of experience. The team can compare simulation data from iRacing to real-world historical data from past races and test sessions.

Reggio handles fuel data, and Simpson monitors strategy and timing. While setups are fixed for the iRacing IndyCar Challenge, Perschbacher is able to work with brake bias. “He’s just trying to bend the rules as much as we can,” Askew said. “We’ve done a lot with brake bias. That’s pretty much all we can change.”

Fans also can watch Askew practicing via a YouTube channel provided by De Giorgis, who has chatted with viewers about the car’s laps in real time during the streams that are available by clicking here.

Fans will be able to find a live stream of Askew’s race Saturday by clicking here.


It’s all relatively new to Askew, who doesn’t even have a sim rig at his Indianapolis home. His previous sim experience mainly came on the Chevrolet simulator in Huntersville, North Carolina.

“Honesty, for me personally, I’m a little late to the party,” Askew said. “I don’t think a lot of people realize that. I’m young and they assumed I’ve been doing this. I’ve never even had my own iRacing account before. Guys like (McLaren driver) Lando Norris, (Watkins Glen winner) Sage (Karam), all these guys have been streaming live on Twitch and have been running iRacing for multiple years now.

“ It’s a great way to get fans engaged in the race weekend and get eSports get bigger and bigger every year. Very interesting moving forward. It’s cool that IndyCar has dipped their feet into these waters now. Even once the season starts, I wouldn’t be surprised if we do more of these races.”

If so, he and his team have learned to keep an eye on Power, a real-world ace on road courses. During some practice races Thursday, Askew thought he’d done well by qualifying third, but Power then put a half-second on the field by winning the pole position.

“Will is unbelievably quick and does the same things in real life as well,” said Askew, who did turn the fastest lap in the practice race. “He just pulls it out somehow. That’s where the engineers and our staff in Indy come into play because they’re able to watch his on-board in real time and replay his on board to figure out what he’s doing to get the most of out of his car in the video game.

“It gets the creative juices flowing again. It’s still very different from real life, but I think we’re going to be able to start the season a little more fresh than we would have without this.”

Chris Graythen / Getty Images